‘The challenge’ Tink says can lift Central West rugby to new heights

Photo: NICK MCGRATH
Photo: NICK MCGRATH

Ask Matt Tink what lured him home from a life of cherry blossoms, sushi and teaching Japanese blokes how to scrummage and the answer is pretty simple.

The challenge.

Tink was introduced as the new Central West Rugby Union chief executive officer on Thursday morning after arriving in Orange, where he’ll be based, this week having finishing up his role as forwards coach of Japanese club the Honda Heat.

The Central West is one of the largest rugby regions in the state and Tink says helping elevate the area into a rugby nursery the envy of all of NSW is what's driving him in his latest role.

In short, it’s the challenge he’s been craving. 

“I can’t wait to rip in,” Tink said. 

“I’m not kidding myself, there’s going to be challenges ... I could be coaching scrummaging at Japan next week, but one of the biggest things that excited me was the challenge.

“I unashamedly say I want this to be the best run sports organisation in NSW and the country, an organisation that people look to, one that people want to be part of.

“People want to be part of success and hopefully we can get more and more successful.”

A former member of the coaching staff at both the Western Force and NSW Waratahs, Tink has strong links to the region, most notably in Dubbo.

He’s a former Kangaroos premiership-winning mentor and coached the Blue Bulls in 2007, a program Tink is still very proud of being part of.

The 43-year-old said the strength of Central West rugby is the representative program headlined by the Blue Bulls and, naturally, the region’s competitions – the Blowes Clothing Cup and GrainCorp Cups.

I unashamedly say I want this to be the best run sports organisation in NSW and the country.

CWRU CEO Matt Tink

But, on the latter, he said with a new three-tier senior structure in place for the next two years, teething problems will be inevitable.

But he’ll be working hard to ensure the system works so players and clubs are part of a successful model.

“The competition is the flagship of Central West rugby, that and the Blue Bulls and our colts and women’s representatives teams,” he said.

“We’re here for the players and they want a well-run, well-structured competition, so we’ve got to get on to that.”

Tink’s first point of business would be meeting with fellow members of the Central West Rugby Union board and then contacting each club in the region ahead of the new-look, revamped 2018 season.

“I work for the rugby community, they don’t work for me. If I can, I’ll be available to them,” he added, before outlining what he wants following his first 12 months in he gig.

“A lot of happy participants, happy presidents and more people wanting to get involved in the game."

All of Central West Rugby Union’s competitions – the Blowes Clothing Cup tiers and the GrainCorp Cup – kick-off on Saturday, April 7.