Waters flow into Wyangala

Above - Wyangala Dam pictured on February 6 this year at 8.7 per cent. Below - the dam at 33.3 per cent on Monday, August 10. Photo: Farmpix Photography

Above - Wyangala Dam pictured on February 6 this year at 8.7 per cent. Below - the dam at 33.3 per cent on Monday, August 10. Photo: Farmpix Photography

Wyangala Dam's storage level has almost doubled in two weeks with recent rains, according to Water NSW - and it's seen a dramatic rise since the weekend.

Water NSW data shows the dam has risen from just under 25 per cent on Sunday, August 9 to 39.14 per cent on Thursday, August 13.

It's a "dramatic turnaround", according to WaterNSW's Tony Webber.

"That's up from nine per cent in February," he said.

"The situation has vastly improved from the end of last summer for example, with respect to town water supply and water security generally.

"Ideally we would see these storages much higher going into summer but we'll take whatever we can get at this point."

Mr Webber said capacity may reach 40 per cent in the coming days, with Wyangala and Burrinjuck receiving significant inflows following heavy rainfall across regional NSW.

"We think there's a possibility of it reaching 40 per cent of capacity but only time will tell," he said.

While there is chance of showers this weekend, Mr Webber said the long term forecast is painting a very positive picture for the region's water storages.

"The bureau are telling us the months ahead we can expect average or above rainfall so that's encouraging," he said.

The rainfall saw the Lachlan River reach minor flood levels at Cottons Weir, peaking at a little higher than 4 metres late Wednesday night.

At the Iron Bridge in Forbes the water peaked at 7.929m, below the minor flood level of 8.8m.

The inflows mean restrictions on general security irrigation water have been lifted.

The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment on Monday announced general security water licence holders would be able to access to remaining restricted water held in accounts.

Based on the inflows to date, there is now enough water to meet critical human and high priority needs, the DPI said, allowing the temporary water restriction to be repealed.