Why we pause to remember on Anzac Day

RESPECT: Marchers can wear their own or a relative's medals. Your own medals should be worn on the left hand side of your chest, over your heart.
RESPECT: Marchers can wear their own or a relative's medals. Your own medals should be worn on the left hand side of your chest, over your heart.

AS the sun rises on April 25, thousands of Australians will attend a solemn ceremony.

The Anzac Day dawn service is usually held at a town cenotaph, or at a memorial park, or in Canberra, at the Australian War Memorial.

Later in the day, people will join the Anzac Day march and parade, alongside schoolchildren and perhaps relatives wearing medals bestowed to loved ones.

A commemoration service may also be held, where a wreath may be laid at a cenotaph or monument marking soldiers who fell when serving for their country.

MODERN DAY: The Gallipoli peninsula, where the original Anzacs landed.

MODERN DAY: The Gallipoli peninsula, where the original Anzacs landed.

In the afternoon, people may indulge in a game of "two-up" at their local pub or club.

Anzac Day marks the first landing of "diggers" from the Australian Imperial Force at Gaba Tepe, now known as Anzac Cove, on April 25, 1915.

Twenty thousand Australian soldiers landed just before dawn on the Gallipoli peninsula.

By nightfall, 747 of those soldiers would lie dead on the beach or close by in the surrounding steep cliffs, killed by Turkish troops.

TRADITION: Laying a wreath entwined with rosemary, which symbolises remembrance, is popular on Anzac Day. Wreaths were first used by ancient Romans to crown victors.

TRADITION: Laying a wreath entwined with rosemary, which symbolises remembrance, is popular on Anzac Day. Wreaths were first used by ancient Romans to crown victors.

The Gallipoli campaign claimed the lives of 8000 Australian soldiers; in all, more than 60,000 Australians died during World War I.

Anzac Days remember their courage and valour and provide a nation with an opportunity to reflect on our first major military action during World War I.

Lest we forget.

This story For those who fell on foreign shores first appeared on Local News.