Forbes called to end domestic violence

Stevie Darcy and Jade Acheson set up a stall outside of Yoorana Gunya to raise awareness for White Ribbon Day.
Stevie Darcy and Jade Acheson set up a stall outside of Yoorana Gunya to raise awareness for White Ribbon Day.

Members of Binaal Billa Violence Prevention Legal Service have called on the Forbes community to stand up against violence against women on White Ribbon Day.

They set up a stall outside of Yoorana Gunya Family Healing Centre Aboriginal Corporation on November 25 where they handed out information, white ribbons and themed cupcakes.

Binaal Billa's Stevie Darcy said they wanted to raise awareness about violence against women and children.

In a release, Binaal Billa Promotions Officer Dannielle McDonald said Binaal Billa wishes to continue its support of campaigns that are anti-violence against women and in support of safe motherhood.

The white ribbon in recent times symbolises this.

"White Ribbon is a global movement that focuses on making personal and community change to prevent violence against women and children," she said.

White Ribbon Day is a chance for the Australian community to come together and say no to men's violence against women.

Since 1991, White Ribbon Day around the world has been held on November 25 to coincide with the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women.

Forbes traditionally holds a public march through the centre of town, inviting community members to gather in Victoria Park and take the White Ribbon oath: "I will stand up, speak out and act to prevent men's violence against women".

This year does look different, and White Ribbon Australia Executive Director Brad Chilcott said White Ribbon Day was just the start of a national call to action for everyone to play a role in eliminating men's violence against women.

"We know it's not a one-size-fits all approach and it will require all of us to be all in. Working collectively, we can end men's violence against women community by community and workplace by workplace," Mr Chilcott said.

"It's time to develop diverse, community-led responses to create a future free from all forms of men's violence and abuse.

"Communities have the solutions to the challenges they face and workers are best placed to know how to make their workplaces safer and more equal.

"White Ribbon Day events aren't an end in themselves - they're a catalyst for ongoing action, and we urge those attending events to start Community Action Groups to provide pathways for meaningful action to create change," Mr Chilcott said.

"Together, we can eliminate men's violence against women - community by community and workplace by workplace."